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Crosby Street Synagogue

1834

Crosby Street Synagogue Exterior

Crosby Street Synagogue Exterior

At the population of the city, including the Jews, was moving uptown, the location on Mill Street (now South William Street) in Lower Manhattan became increasingly inconvenient.  In 1834 the congregation built a new synagogue on Crosby Street (street numbers 56 to 62), between Broom and Spring Street.  It was fifty-three feet wide and seventy five feet long, substantially larger that the previous two buildings.  The conerstone for this building was the same one that had been used in the first Mill Street synagogue - a vivid symbol of the continuity of generations and traditions within the congregation.  The synagogue was built with a basement, ten feet high, which was used for housing a chapel, the congregational school, and meeting rooms.

 

The Crosby Street synagogue was described in the New York Times as a "remarkably neat building."  The Boston Courier reported that it had been "constructed in admirable taste."

Omer Board

Shearith Israel’s “Omer Board” dates back to the Mill Street Synagogue of 1730, and may indeed go back to the early years of the Congregation’s history. 

1730
Chatham Square Cemetery

The oldest of our extant cemeteries is known as the Chatham Square Cemetery.  It is located in Chinatown at 55 St. James Place.  The land was originally purchased in 1682 by Joseph Bueno de Mesquita. 

1682